We understand the
PUBLIC TOILETS.

Toilet Monitoring System

The standards of the organisation, is reflected in their toilets

The Toilet Monitoring System is powerful and real time monitoring system based on customer feedback. You get instant notification on your phone when a customer walks out with a bad toilet day.Get actionable insights on the easy to understand dashboard and see how your toilet performs any day and everyday!

  • Real time monitoring of toilets & stuff
  • Sound serious & reliable about cleanliness
  • Real time statistics
  • Upscale the quality of your organisation
  • Better aesthetics of toilets
  • SMS notifications to supervisors
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OUR PROCESS

Not just flushing, we have an interesting process to keep the public toilets clean.

1

Deploys monitoring systems in public toilets.

2

Collects honest feedbacks from public.

3

Understanding data with cloud based database.

4

Realtime 24hours reports send directly to supervisors.

5

Concerned authority acts upon the data for cleaner public toilets.

OUR PROCESS

Not just flushing, we have an interesting process
to keep the public toilets clean.

1

Deploys monitoring systems in public toilets.

2

Collects honest feedbacks from public.

3

Understanding data with cloud based database.

4

Realtime 24hours reports send directly to supervisors.

5

Concerned authority acts upon the data for cleaner public toilets.

Vision

Early in 2017, at a meetup organized by YourStory for startups in Kochi, a bunch of students from CUSAT presented a mobile application developed to solve the problem of public toilet accessibility. By mapping available public toilets in cities, they hoped to encourage people to use them more. Inadvertently, it also opened a can of worms to bigger problems like the lack of sanitation or infrastructure at these facilities. Humble Shit, a startup focusing on improving the usability of public toilets in urban spaces. Samir Dayal Singh, the founder of the company sat down with us to explain his startup.

FAQ

So during my research, I realized that part of the reason why our public toilets were in the state they are was due to the stigma attached with cleaning up after use, a social conditioning as a result of centuries of casteism, and its aftereffects. We also understood that context plays a huge role in analyzing the behaviour of people using public toilets. For example, a person using a toilet at a hospital will be more cautious to clean up after themselves and maintain the hygiene of the facility, as they may use the facility again. At the same time, a person using a toilet at a bus stand will possibly never revisit that it again, and hence, the level of ownership displayed to maintain the toilet’s cleanliness will be much lesser.

We are a hardware startup developing a hygiene & usability rating system for public toilets. Through our “Toilet Monitoring System” installed at these toilets, users can rate their experience using them as good, average, or bad. Supervisors then receive a report of this data, showing them how their janitorial staff are working. We are currently running a pilot project at Amrita Hospital at Edapally.

I had always been sensitized to the state of public toilets in rural areas since my father was part of projects like Swacch Bharat and UN for over 15 years. I started thinking about public toilets after my mother fell ill from using a public toilet back in Bihar. I was in my final year of engineering at the time, so, for our main college project, we decided to develop a technology solution to solve this problem. Our professor – Mr K.K. Saju supported us, helping us secure our first funding through the Department of Science & Technology.

Our first concept was an app to map available public toilets. But soon, we found that technology alone wouldn’t help. I came to the conclusion that a more hands-on approach was required. I thought of activism, but scaling would be a problem. Also, inefficient civic bodies and corrupt NGOs appointed to maintain these toilets created a vicious cycle of unaccountability. The solution, therefore, lay in approaching it as a business, accountable, efficient, and free of the stigma of casteism. The Toilet Monitoring System’s rating of users’ experiences would ensure a real-time feedback mechanism reflecting the state of these toilets’ hygiene, in turn confirming the quality of the janitors’ jobs.

(laughs) We believe humility goes a long way in learning and evolving, so we called ourselves Humble Innovations. But the name felt too long, so it became Humble Shit. We received a lot of feedback from experienced people telling us to change the name, but these were the same people who never bothered to solve such basic problems. In comparison, our generation talks openly about problems otherwise considered taboo, like female periods and public sanitation. And the only way to find solutions is to encourage more conversations. So, our name is us opening up a dialogue about the issue of public toilets.

We have benefitted from KSUM’s Idea Grant followed by an additional funding for product development, and for scaling. Our immediate goal is to perfect our technology, for which we have received a funding from Govt. of India’s BIRAC division. The expansion is in the pipeline. Incentivizing dedicated janitors is another area of interest. Finally, we’re trying to gain as much contextual awareness about how toilets are used in different scenarios to make our solution more long-term. Follow The Humble Shit Blogs on Medium

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© Humble Innovations • INCLIVE Accelerator, IIM Calicut

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